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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549



 

 



 

 



 

 



FORM 10-Q



 

 



 

 



 

 

(Mark One)



  QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017



  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from _______ to _______

Commission file number 1-32167



 

 



 

 



 

 

VAALCO Energy, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)



 

 



 

 



 

 







 

 

Delaware

 

760274813

(State or other jurisdiction of

Incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)



 

9800 Richmond Avenue

Suite 700

Houston, Texas

 

77042

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip code)

(713) 623-0801

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)



 

 



 

 



 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No    

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No   

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.





 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer

Non‑accelerated filer

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Exchange Act Rule 12b-2).          Yes      No  

As of August 1, 2017, there were outstanding 58,818,031 shares of common stock, $0.10 par value per share, of the registrant. 

 









 

 


 

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VAALCO ENERGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Table of Contents





 



 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

Six Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

18 

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

26 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

27 

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

28 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

28 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

28 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

29 



 Unless the context otherwise indicates, references to “VAALCO,” “the Company”, “we,” “our,” or “us” in this Form 10-Q are references to VAALCO Energy, Inc., including its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

VAALCO ENERGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)  

(in thousands, except number of shares and par value amounts)





 

 

 

 

 

 



 

June 30,

 

December 31,



 

2017

 

2016

ASSETS

 

(in thousands)

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

20,640 

 

$

20,474 

Restricted cash

 

 

802 

 

 

741 

Receivables:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trade

 

 

8,062 

 

 

6,751 

Accounts with partners, net of allowance of $0.5 million at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016

 

 

978 

 

 

3,297 

Other

 

 

 

 

120 

Crude oil inventory

 

 

952 

 

 

913 

Prepayments and other

 

 

4,392 

 

 

4,040 

Current assets - discontinued operations

 

 

2,578 

 

 

2,139 

Total current assets

 

 

38,405 

 

 

38,475 

Property and equipment - successful efforts method:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wells, platforms and other production facilities

 

 

389,192 

 

 

389,231 

Undeveloped acreage

 

 

10,000 

 

 

10,000 

Equipment and other

 

 

10,283 

 

 

9,779 



 

 

409,475 

 

 

409,010 

Accumulated depreciation, depletion, amortization and impairment

 

 

(384,209)

 

 

(380,991)

Net property and equipment

 

 

25,266 

 

 

28,019 

Other noncurrent assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restricted cash

 

 

918 

 

 

918 

Value added tax and other receivables, net of allowance of $5.4 million
and $4.7 million at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively

 

 

6,044 

 

 

5,110 

Abandonment funding

 

 

8,510 

 

 

8,510 

Total assets

 

$

79,143 

 

$

81,032 



 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

14,968 

 

$

19,096 

Accrued liabilities and other

 

 

9,568 

 

 

10,506 

Current portion of long term debt

 

 

8,333 

 

 

7,500 

Accounts with partners

 

 

291 

 

 

 -

Current liabilities - discontinued operations

 

 

15,186 

 

 

18,452 

Total current liabilities

 

 

48,346 

 

 

55,554 

Asset retirement obligations

 

 

18,947 

 

 

18,612 

Other long term liabilities

 

 

283 

 

 

284 

Long term debt, excluding current portion

 

 

4,642 

 

 

6,940 

Total liabilities

 

 

72,218 

 

 

81,390 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders’ equity (deficit):

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, none issued, 500,000 shares authorized, $25 par value

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

Common stock, 66,348,910 and 66,109,565 shares issued
$0.10 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized

 

 

6,635 

 

 

6,611 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

70,985 

 

 

70,268 

Less treasury stock, 7,555,095 shares at cost

 

 

(37,933)

 

 

(37,933)

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(32,762)

 

 

(39,304)

Total shareholders' equity (deficit)

 

 

6,925 

 

 

(358)

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity (deficit)

 

$

79,143 

 

$

81,032 



 

 

 

 

 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.



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VAALCO ENERGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except per share amounts)







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

Six Months Ended June 30,



 

2017

 

2016

 

2017

 

2016

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oil and natural gas sales

 

$

20,425 

 

$

18,847 

 

$

41,691 

 

$

29,823 

Operating costs and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Production expense

 

 

9,866 

 

 

7,341 

 

 

17,812 

 

 

18,594 

Exploration expense

 

 

 -

 

 

 

 

 -

 

 

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

 

1,970 

 

 

1,942 

 

 

3,839 

 

 

4,180 

General and administrative expense

 

 

3,049 

 

 

4,004 

 

 

6,191 

 

 

6,251 

Other operating expense

 

 

 -

 

 

754 

 

 

 -

 

 

9,635 

General and administrative related
to shareholder matters

 

 

 -

 

 

18 

 

 

 -

 

 

(435)

Bad debt expense and other

 

 

183 

 

 

171 

 

 

281 

 

 

514 

Total operating costs and expenses

 

 

15,068 

 

 

14,232 

 

 

28,123 

 

 

38,741 

Other operating income, net

 

 

230 

 

 

 -

 

 

167 

 

 

18 

Operating income (loss)

 

 

5,587 

 

 

4,615 

 

 

13,735 

 

 

(8,900)

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(378)

 

 

(1,470)

 

 

(781)

 

 

(1,958)

Other, net

 

 

338 

 

 

(642)

 

 

222 

 

 

(384)

Total other income (expense)

 

 

(40)

 

 

(2,112)

 

 

(559)

 

 

(2,342)

Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes

 

 

5,547 

 

 

2,503 

 

 

13,176 

 

 

(11,242)

Income tax expense

 

 

3,096 

 

 

3,001 

 

 

6,290 

 

 

4,686 

Income (loss) from continuing operations

 

 

2,451 

 

 

(498)

 

 

6,886 

 

 

(15,928)

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

 

(168)

 

 

(20)

 

 

(344)

 

 

7,786 

Net income (loss)

 

$

2,283 

 

$

(518)

 

$

6,542 

 

$

(8,142)



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic net income (loss) per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income (loss) from continuing operations

 

$

0.04 

 

$

(0.01)

 

$

0.12 

 

$

(0.27)

Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

 

(0.00)

 

 

(0.00)

 

 

(0.01)

 

 

0.13 

Net income (loss)

 

$

0.04 

 

$

(0.01)

 

$

0.11 

 

$

(0.14)

Basic weighted average shares outstanding

 

 

58,658 

 

 

58,464 

 

 

58,613 

 

 

58,488 

Diluted net income (loss) per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income (loss) from continuing operations

 

$

0.04 

 

$

(0.01)

 

$

0.12 

 

$

(0.27)

Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

 

(0.00)

 

 

(0.00)

 

 

(0.01)

 

 

0.13 

Net income (loss)

 

$

0.04 

 

$

(0.01)

 

$

0.11 

 

$

(0.14)

Diluted weighted average shares outstanding

 

 

58,658 

 

 

58,464 

 

 

58,619 

 

 

58,488 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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VAALCO ENERGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

(in thousands)





 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Six Months Ended June 30,



 

2017

 

2016

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

 

$

6,542 

 

$

(8,142)

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by (used in)
operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss (income) from discontinued operations

 

 

344 

 

 

(7,786)

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

 

3,839 

 

 

4,180 

Other amortization

 

 

201 

 

 

1,076 

Unrealized foreign exchange loss

 

 

(580)

 

 

(102)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

783 

 

 

1,434 

Commodity derivatives loss

 

 

50 

 

 

578 

Bad debt provision

 

 

281 

 

 

514 

Other operating income, net

 

 

(167)

 

 

(18)

Change in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trade receivables

 

 

(1,314)

 

 

(2,010)

Accounts with partners

 

 

2,610 

 

 

9,043 

Other receivables

 

 

58 

 

 

(52)

Crude oil inventory

 

 

(39)

 

 

(65)

Value added tax and other receivables

 

 

(1,130)

 

 

(1,236)

Prepayments and other

 

 

395 

 

 

(334)

Accounts payable

 

 

(4,274)

 

 

(11,591)

Accrued liabilities and other

 

 

(977)

 

 

144 

Net cash provided by (used in) continuing operating activities

 

 

6,622 

 

 

(14,367)

Net cash provided by (used in) discontinued operating activities

 

 

(4,049)

 

 

15,996 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

 

2,573 

 

 

1,629 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Increase) decrease in restricted cash

 

 

(61)

 

 

265 

Acquisitions

 

 

64 

 

 

 -

Property and equipment expenditures

 

 

(1,032)

 

 

(10,448)

Proceeds from the sale of oil and gas properties

 

 

250 

 

 

 -

Premiums paid

 

 

 -

 

 

(824)

Net cash used in continuing investing activities

 

 

(779)

 

 

(11,007)

Net cash used in discontinued investing activities

 

 

 -

 

 

(2,221)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(779)

 

 

(13,228)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from the issuances of common stock

 

 

38 

 

 

 -

Debt issuance costs

 

 

 -

 

 

(77)

Debt repayment

 

 

(5,833)

 

 

 -

Borrowings

 

 

4,167 

 

 

 -

Net cash used in continuing financing activities

 

 

(1,628)

 

 

(77)

Net cash provided by discontinued financing activities

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

Net cash used in financing activities

 

 

(1,628)

 

 

(77)

NET CHANGE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

 

 

166 

 

 

(11,676)

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT BEGINNING OF PERIOD

 

 

20,474 

 

 

25,357 

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF PERIOD

 

$

20,640 

 

$

13,681 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest paid, net of capitalized interest

 

$

574 

 

$

772 

Income taxes paid

 

$

9,142 

 

$

4,435 

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment additions incurred but not paid at period end

 

$

423 

 

$

2,111 

Asset retirement obligation

 

$

(103)

 

$

42 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements. 





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VAALCO ENERGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES 

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1.  ORGANIZATION AND ACCOUNTING POLICIES 

VAALCO Energy, Inc. (together with its consolidated subsidiaries, “VAALCO,” or the “Company”) is a Houston, Texas based independent energy company engaged in the acquisition, exploration, development and production of crude oil. As operator, we have production operations and conduct development activities in Gabon, West Africa. As non-operator, we have opportunities to participate in development and exploration activities in Equatorial Guinea, West Africa. As discussed further in Note 3 below, we have discontinued operations associated with our activities in Angola, West Africa.

Our consolidated subsidiaries are VAALCO Gabon (Etame), Inc., VAALCO Production (Gabon), Inc., VAALCO Gabon S.A., VAALCO Angola (Kwanza), Inc., VAALCO UK (North Sea), Ltd., VAALCO International, Inc., VAALCO Energy (EG), Inc., VAALCO Energy Mauritius (EG) Limited and VAALCO Energy (USA), Inc.

These condensed consolidated financial statements are unaudited, but in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of results for the interim periods presented. All adjustments are of a normal recurring nature unless disclosed otherwise. Interim period results are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for the full year.

These condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and do not include all the information and disclosures required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) for complete financial statements. They should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, which include a summary of the significant accounting policies.

Certain reclassifications have been made to prior period amounts related to reclassifying material and supplies to prepayments and other to conform to the current period presentation. These reclassifications did not affect our consolidated financial results.

Bad debtQuarterly, we evaluate our accounts receivable balances to confirm collectability. When collectability is in doubt, we record an allowance against the accounts receivable and a corresponding income charge for bad debts, which appears in the “Bad debt expense and other” line of the condensed consolidated statements of operations. The majority of our accounts receivable balances are with our joint venture partners, purchasers of our production and the government of Gabon for reimbursable Value-Added Tax (“VAT”). Collection efforts, including remedies provided for in the contracts, are pursued to collect overdue amounts owed to us. Portions of our costs in Gabon (including our VAT receivable) are denominated in the local currency of Gabon, the Central African CFA Franc (“XAF”). As of June 30, 2017, the outstanding VAT receivable balance, excluding the allowance for bad debt, was approximately XAF 20.2 billion (XAF 6.3 billion, net to VAALCO).  As of June 30, 2017, the exchange rate was XAF574.87 = $1.00.

In June 2016, we entered into an agreement with the government of Gabon to receive payments related to the outstanding VAT receivable balance, which was approximately XAF 16.3 billion (XAF 4.9 billion, net to VAALCO) as of December 31, 2015, in thirty-six monthly installments of $0.2 million, net to VAALCO. We received one monthly installment payment in July 2016; however, no further payments have been received. We are in discussions with the Gabonese government regarding the timing of the resumption of payments.  

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, we recorded allowances of $0.2 million and $0.3 million, respectively, related to VAT for which the government of Gabon has not reimbursed us.    For the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2016, we recorded allowances of $0.1 million and $0.5 million, respectively. The receivable amount, net of allowances, is reported as a non-current asset in the “Value added tax and other receivables” line item in the condensed consolidated balance sheets. Because both the VAT receivable and the related allowances are denominated in XAF, the exchange rate revaluation of these balances into U.S. dollars at the end of each reporting period also has an impact on profit/loss. Such foreign currency gains (losses) are reported separately in the Other, operating income (loss), net line of the condensed consolidated statements of operations.

General and administrative related to shareholder matters – General and administrative expenses related to shareholder matters for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016 represent costs incurred related to shareholder litigation that was settled in April 2016. For 2016, the amounts also include the offsetting insurance proceeds related to these matters. 

 

2.  NEW ACCOUNTING STANDARDS

Not yet adopted

In May 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU No. 2017-09, Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting (ASU 2017-09) to clarify when to account for a change to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award as a modification. Under ASU 2017-09, modification accounting is required only if the fair value, the vesting conditions, or the classification of the award (as equity or liability) changes as a result of the change in terms or conditions. The amendments in ASU 2017-09 are effective for all entities for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. The amendments in this update are to be applied prospectively to an award modified on or after the adoption date. We are

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currently evaluating the provisions of ASU 2017-09 and are assessing its potential impact on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and related disclosures.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business (ASU 2017-01”). The purpose of the amendment is to clarify the definition of a business with the objective of adding guidance to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. For public entities, the amendments in ASU 2017-01 are effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. The amendments in this update are to be applied prospectively to acquisitions and disposals completed on or after the effective date, with no disclosures required at transition. The adoption of ASU 2017-01 is not expected to have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and related disclosures.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash (“ASU 2016-18”), which requires that a statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. Therefore, amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents should be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-18 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. We are currently evaluating the provisions of this guidance and are assessing its potential impact on our cash flows and related disclosures. Due to the nature of this accounting standards update, this may have an impact on items reported in our statements of cash flows, but no impact is expected on our financial position, results of operations or related disclosures as a result of implementation.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (“ASU 2016-15”) related to how certain cash receipts and payments are presented and classified in the statement of cash flows. These cash flow issues include debt prepayment or extinguishment costs, settlement of zero-coupon debt, contingent consideration payments made after a business combination, proceeds from the settlement of insurance claims, distributions received from equity method investees, beneficial interests in securitization transactions, and separately identifiable cash flows. ASU 2016-15 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. We are currently evaluating the provisions of this guidance and are assessing its potential impact on our cash flows and related disclosures. Due to the nature of this accounting standards update, this may have an impact on items reported in our statements of cash flows, but no impact is expected on our financial position, results of operations or related disclosures as a result of implementation.

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (“ASU 2016-13”) related to the calculation of credit losses on financial instruments. All financial instruments not accounted for at fair value will be impacted, including our trade and partner receivables. Allowances are to be measured using a current expected credit loss model as of the reporting date which is based on historical experience, current conditions and reasonable and supportable forecasts. This is significantly different from the current model which increases the allowance when losses are probable. This change is effective for all public companies for fiscal years beginning after December 31, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years and will be applied with a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the guidance is effective. We are currently evaluating the provisions of ASU 2016-13 and are assessing its potential impact on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and related disclosures.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (“ASU 2016-02”), which amends the accounting standards for leases.  ASU 2016-02 retains a distinction between finance leases and operating leases. The primary change is the recognition of lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases on the balance sheet. The classification criteria for distinguishing between finance leases and operating leases are substantially similar to the classification criteria for distinguishing between capital leases and operating leases in the previous guidance. Certain aspects of lease accounting have been simplified and additional qualitative and quantitative disclosures are required along with specific quantitative disclosures required by lessees and lessors to meet the objective of enabling users of financial statements to assess the amount, timing, and uncertainty of cash flows arising from leases. In transition, lessees and lessors are required to recognize and measure leases at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach. The amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early application permitted. We are required to use a modified retrospective approach for leases that exist or are entered into after the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements. Early adoption is allowed. Assuming adoption January 1, 2019, we expect that leases in effect on January 1, 2017 and leases entered into after such date will be reflected in accordance with the new standard in the audited consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for 2019, including comparative financial statements presented in such report. We are in the preliminary stages of our gap assessment, but we expect that leases treated as operating leases with terms greater than 12 months will be capitalized. We expect adoption of this standard to result in the recording of a right of use asset related to certain of our operating leases with a corresponding lease liability. This is expected to result in a material increase in total assets and liabilities as certain of our operating leases are significant as disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for 2016. We do not expect there will be a material overall impact on results of operations or cash flows. We are continuing to evaluate the impact of this new standard, and are in the process of developing our implementation plan.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (“ASU 2014-09”). The new standard will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. GAAP. The core principle of ASU 2014-09 requires

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companies to reevaluate when revenue is recorded on a transaction based upon newly defined criteria, either at a point in time or over time as goods or services are delivered. The ASU requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgments and estimates, and changes in those estimates. In early 2016, the FASB issued additional guidance: ASU No. 2016-10, 2016-11 and 2016-12 (and together with ASU 2014-09, “Revenue Recognition ASU”). These updates provide further guidance and clarification on specific items within the previously issued ASU 2014-09. The Revenue Recognition ASU becomes effective for the Company as of January 1, 2018, with the option to early adopt the standard for annual periods beginning on or after December 15, 2016, and allows for both retrospective and modified-retrospective methods of adoption. The Company does not plan to early adopt the standard. We have preliminarily concluded that we will adopt the Revenue Recognition ASU via the modified retrospective transition method, taking advantage of the allowed practical expedients. We are substantially complete with our gap assessment and have determined that we will qualify for point in time recognition for essentially all of our sales. As such, the Company does not expect adoption of this standard to result in a change in the timing of revenue recognition compared to current practices, and therefore we do not expect adoption of this standard to have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations. We do expect that we will have expanded disclosures around the nature of our sales contracts and other matters related to revenues and the accounting for revenues. We are continuing to evaluate the impact of this new standard, and are in the process of developing our implementation plan.

Adopted

In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-11, Inventory (Topic 330): Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory (ASU 2015-11) to simplify the measurement of inventory. This simplification applies to all inventory other than that measured using last-in, first out (“LIFO”) or the retail inventory method and requires measurement of inventory at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Net realizable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predictable cost of completion, disposal and transportation. This guidance is to be applied prospectively effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016. We adopted ASU 2015-11 in the first quarter of 2017 and the application of this guidance did not have a significant impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.







3.  AQUISITIONS AND DISPOSITIONS

Sojitz Acquisition

On November 22, 2016, we closed on the purchase of an additional 2.98% working interest (3.23% participating interest) in the Etame Marin block located offshore the Republic of Gabon from Sojitz Etame Limited (“Sojitz”), which represents all interest owned by Sojitz in the concession. The acquisition had an effective date of August 1, 2016 and was funded with cash on hand.

The following amounts represent the preliminary estimates of the fair value of identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the Sojitz acquisition. The final determination of fair value for certain assets and liabilities will be completed as soon as the information necessary to complete the analysis is obtained. These amounts will be finalized as soon as possible, but no later than one year from the date of the acquisition.





 

 



 

November 22, 2016



 

(in thousands)

Assets acquired:

 

 

Wells, platforms and other production facilities

$

5,754 

Equipment and other

 

684 

Value added tax and other receivables

 

297 

Abandonment funding

 

546 

Accounts receivable - trade

 

888 

Other current assets

 

220 

Liabilities assumed:

 

 

Asset retirement obligations

 

(1,731)

Accrued liabilities and other

 

(747)

Total identifiable net assets and consideration transferred

$

5,911 

All assets and liabilities associated with Sojitz’s interest in Etame Marin block, including oil and gas properties, asset retirement obligations and working capital items were recorded at their fair value. In determining the fair value of the oil and gas properties, we prepared estimates of oil and natural gas reserves. We used estimated future prices to apply to the estimated reserve quantities acquired and the estimated future operating and development costs to arrive at the estimates of future net revenues. The valuations to derive the purchase price included the use of both proved and unproved categories of reserves, expectation for timing of production and amount of future development and operating costs, projections of future rates of production, expected recovery rates, and risk adjusted discount rates. Other significant estimates were used by management to calculate fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed. We may record purchase price adjustments as a result of changes in such estimates. These assumptions represent Level 3 inputs.

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Sale of Certain U.S. Properties

In April 2017, we completed the sale of our interests in the East Poplar Dome field in Montana for $0.3 million, resulting in a gain of approximately $0.3 million in the three and six months ended June 30, 2017.

Discontinued Operations - Angola

In November 2006, our Angolan subsidiary, Vaalco Angola  (Kwanza), Inc., (“VAALCO Angola”), signed a production sharing contract for Block 5 offshore Angola (“PSA”). The four year primary term, referred to as the Initial Exploration Phase (IEP”), with an optional three year extension, awarded VAALCO Angola exploration rights to 1.4 million acres offshore central Angola, with a commitment to drill two exploratory wells. The IEP was extended on two occasions to run until December 1, 2014. In October 2014, VAALCO Angola entered into the Subsequent Exploration Phase (“SEP”) which extended the exploration period to November 30, 2017 and required VAALCO Angola and the co-participating interest owner, the Angolan national oil company, Sonangol P&P, to drill two additional exploration wells. VAALCO Angola’s working interest is 40%, and it carries Sonangol P&P, for 10% of the work program.  On September 30, 2016, VAALCO Angola notified Sonangol P&P that it was withdrawing from the joint operating agreement effective October 31, 2016. On November 30, 2016, VAALCO Angola notified the national concessionaire, Sonangol E.P., that it was withdrawing from the PSA. Further to the decision to withdraw from Angola, VAALCO Angola has taken actions to begin reducing its office in Angola and reducing future activities in Angola. As a result of this strategic shift, we classified all the related assets and liabilities as those of discontinued operations in the condensed consolidated balance sheets. The operating results of the Angola segment have been classified as discontinued operations for all periods presented in our condensed consolidated statements of operations. We segregated the cash flows attributable to the Angola segment from the cash flows from continuing operations for all periods presented in our condensed consolidated statements of cash flows. The following tables summarize selected financial information related to the Angola segment’s assets and liabilities as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 and its operations for the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2017 and 2016.

Summarized Results of Discontinued Operations





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

Six Months Ended June 30,



 

2017

 

2016

 

2017

 

2016



 

(in thousands)

Operating costs and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

$

 -

 

$

 

$

 -

 

$

General and administrative expense

 

 

167 

 

 

296 

 

 

338 

 

 

594 

Bad debt expense (recovery) and other

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

(7,628)

Total operating costs, expenses and (recovery)

 

 

167 

 

 

299 

 

 

338 

 

 

(7,028)

Other operating loss, net

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

(21)

Operating income (loss)

 

 

(167)

 

 

(299)

 

 

(338)

 

 

7,007 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

3,201 

Other, net

 

 

(1)

 

 

279 

 

 

(3)

 

 

545 

Total other income (expense)

 

 

(1)

 

 

279 

 

 

(3)

 

 

3,746 

Income (loss) from discontinued operations before income taxes

 

 

(168)

 

 

(20)

 

 

(341)

 

 

10,753 

Income tax expense

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 

 

2,967 

Income (loss) from discontinued operations

 

$

(168)

 

$

(20)

 

$

(344)

 

$

7,786 



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Assets and Liabilities Attributable to Discontinued Operations





 

 

 

 

 

 



 

June 30, 2017

 

December 31, 2016



 

(in thousands)

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts with partners

 

$

2,578 

 

$

2,139 

Total current assets

 

 

2,578 

 

 

2,139 

Total assets

 

$

2,578 

 

$

2,139 



 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

10 

 

$

77 

Foreign taxes payable

 

 

 -

 

 

3,078 

Accrued liabilities and other

 

 

15,176 

 

 

15,297 

Total current liabilities

 

 

15,186 

 

 

18,452 

Total liabilities

 

$

15,186 

 

$

18,452 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Drilling Obligation

Under the PSA, Vaalco Angola and the other participating interest owner, Sonangol P&P, were obligated to perform exploration activities that included specified seismic activities and drilling a specified number of wells during each of the exploration phases identified in the PSA. The specified seismic activities were completed, and one well, the Kindele #1 well, was drilled in 2015. The PSA provides a stipulated payment of $10.0 million for each exploration well for which a drilling obligation remains under the terms of the PSA, of which VAALCO Angola’s participating interest share would be $5.0 million per well. We have reflected an accrual of $15.0 million for a potential payment as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively, which represents what we believe to be the maximum potential amount attributable to VAALCO Angola’s interest under the PSA. However, we are currently engaged in discussions with representatives from Sonangol E.P. regarding this potential payment and other possible solutions and believe that the ultimate amount paid will be substantially less than the accrued amount. In connection with these discussions, we have confirmed the existence of a parent company guarantee regarding the potential payment amount.

Other Matters – Partner Receivable

The government-assigned working interest partner was delinquent in paying their share of the costs several times in 2009 and was removed from the production sharing contract in 2010 by a governmental decree. Efforts to collect from the defaulted partner were abandoned in 2012. The available 40% working interest in Block 5, offshore Angola was assigned to Sonangol P&P effective on January 1, 2014. We invoiced Sonangol P&P for the unpaid delinquent amounts from the defaulted partner plus the amounts incurred during the period prior to assignment of the working interest totaling $7.6 million plus interest in April 2014. Because this amount was not paid and Sonangol P&P was slow in paying monthly cash call invoices since their assignment, we placed Sonangol P&P in default in the first quarter of 2015.

On March 14, 2016, we received a $19.0 million payment from Sonangol P&P for the full amount owed us as of December 31, 2015, including the $7.6 million of pre-assignment costs and default interest of $3.2 million. The $7.6 million recovery is reflected in the “Bad debt expense (recovery) and other” line of our summarized results of discontinued operations for the six months ended June 30, 2016. Default interest of $3.2 million is shown in the “Interest income” line of our summarized results of discontinued operations for the six months ended June 30, 2016.





4.  OIL AND NATURAL GAS PROPERTIES AND EQUIPMENT

We review our oil and natural gas producing properties for impairment quarterly or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of such properties may not be recoverable. When an oil and natural gas property’s undiscounted estimated future net cash flows are not sufficient to recover its carrying amount, an impairment charge is recorded to reduce the carrying amount of the asset to its fair value. The fair value of the asset is measured using a discounted cash flow model relying primarily on Level 3 inputs into the undiscounted future net cash flows. The undiscounted estimated future net cash flows used in our impairment evaluations at each quarter end are based upon the most recently prepared independent reserve engineers’ report adjusted to use forecasted prices from the forward strip price curves near each quarter end and adjusted as necessary for drilling and production results.

During the second quarter of 2017, prices remained stable, and we incurred no significant capital spending.  We considered these and other factors and determined that there were no events or circumstances triggering an impairment evaluation for all of our fields.

Declining forecasted oil prices and other factors caused us to perform impairment reviews of our proved properties in the first quarter of 2016 for all fields in the Etame Marin block offshore Gabon and the Hefley field in North Texas. However, no impairment was required for the quarter ended March 31, 2016. During the second quarter of 2016, forecasted oil prices improved significantly, our negative price differential to Brent narrowed and we incurred no significant capital spending. We considered these and other factors

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and determined that there were no events or circumstances triggering an impairment evaluation for most of our fields, with the exception of the Avouma field in the Etame Marine block offshore Gabon. At the Avouma field, the electrical submersible pumps (“ESPs”) in the South Tchibala 2-H well failed on June 23, 2016, and the well was temporarily shut-in. The reserves used in our impairment evaluation of the Avouma field were revised to reflect the impact of this lost production for several months and the impact of the forward price curve. The undiscounted future net cash flows for the Avouma field were in excess of the field’s carrying value. No impairment was required for the Avouma field, or any of our other fields, for the second quarter of 2016.

In July 2017, the ESP in the South Tchibala 2-H well failed, resulting in the well being temporarily shut-in.  We expect to perform a workover to replace the ESP in the next few months.

5.  DEBT

On June 29, 2016, we executed a Supplemental Agreement with the International Finance Corporation (the “IFC”) which, among other things, amended and restated our existing loan agreement to convert $20.0 million of the revolving portion of the credit facility, to a term loan (the “Term Loan”) with $15.0 million outstanding at that date. The amended loan agreement is secured by the assets of our Gabon subsidiary, VAALCO Gabon S.A. and is guaranteed by VAALCO as the parent company. The amended loan agreement provides for quarterly principal and interest payments on the amounts currently outstanding through June 30, 2019, with interest accruing at a rate of LIBOR plus 5.75%.

The amended loan agreement also provided for an additional $5.0 million (the “Additional Term Loan”), which could be requested in a single draw, subject to the IFC’s approval, through March 15, 2017. On March 14, 2017, we borrowed $4.2 million of the Additional Term Loan. The additional borrowings will be repaid in five quarterly principal installments commencing June 30, 2017, together with interest which will accrue at LIBOR plus 5.75%.

Compared to the $13.3 million principal carrying value of debt as of June 30, 2017, $13.0 million carrying value less issuance costs, the estimated fair value of the term loan is $13.1 million when measured using a discounted cash flow model over the life of the current borrowings at forecasted interest rates. The inputs to this model are Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy.

Covenants

Under the amended loan agreement, the ratio of quarter-end net debt to EBITDAX (as defined in the loan agreement) must be no more than 3.0 to 1.0. Additionally, our debt service coverage ratio must be greater than 1.2 to 1.0 at each quarter end. Certain of VAALCO’s subsidiaries are contractually prohibited from making payments, loans or transferring assets to the Parent Company or other affiliated entities. Specifically, under the terms of our IFC Term Loan, VAALCO Gabon S.A. could be restricted from transferring assets or making dividends, if the positive and negative covenants are not in compliance with the Term Loan. Forecasting our compliance with these and other financial covenants in future periods is inherently uncertain; therefore, we can make no assurance that we will be able to comply with our term loan covenants in future periods. Factors that could impact our quarter-end financial covenants in future periods include future realized prices for sales of oil and natural gas, estimated future production, returns generated by our capital program, and future interest costs, among others. We were in compliance with all financial covenants as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016.

Interest 

Until June 29, 2016, under the terms of the original revolving credit facility, we paid commitment fees on the undrawn portion of the total commitment. Commitment fees had been equal to 1.5% of the unused balance of a senior tranche of $50.0 million and 2.3% of the unused balance of a subordinated tranche of $15.0 million when a commitment was available for utilization. With the execution of the Supplemental Agreement with the IFC in June 2016, beginning June 29, 2016 and continuing through March 14, 2017, commitment fees were equal to 2.3% of the undrawn Additional Term Loan amount of $5.0 million. There are no further commitment fees owing after March 14, 2017.

We capitalize interest and commitment fees related to expenditures made in connection with exploration and development projects that are not subject to current depletion. Interest and commitment fees are capitalized only for the period that activities are in progress to bring these projects to their intended use.

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The table below shows the components of the Interest income (expense), net line of our condensed consolidated statements of operations and the average effective interest rate, excluding commitment fees, on our borrowings:

























 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

Six Months Ended June 30,



 

2017

 

2016

 

2017

 

2016



 

(in thousands)

Interest incurred, including commitment fees

 

$

270 

 

$

387 

 

$

574 

 

$

772 

Deferred finance cost amortization

 

 

104 

 

 

103 

 

 

202 

 

 

206 

Deferred finance cost write-off due to loan modification

 

 

 -

 

 

869 

 

 

 -

 

 

869 

Other interest not related to debt

 

 

 

 

111 

 

 

 

 

111 

Interest expense, net

 

$

378 

 

$

1,470 

 

$

781 

 

$

1,958 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average effective interest rate, excluding commitment fees

 

 

6.90% 

 

 

4.38% 

 

 

6.88% 

 

 

4.37% 











6.  COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Litigation

McDonough litigation

On December 7, 2016, a lawsuit was filed against the Company alleging that a former worker on the Company’s oil and gas platforms off the coast of Gabon was terminated because of his age in violation of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and the Texas Commission on Human Rights Act. The Plaintiff sought damages for lost wages and benefits as well as attorneys’ fees. The case was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas and was styled as McDonough v. VAALCO Energy, Inc., No. 4:17-cv-00361. On June 22, 2017, the court entered a final order of dismissal, pursuant to the plaintiff’s motion for voluntary dismissal, and entered final judgment in favor of the Company. This matter is now resolved, and has no material effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.

Abandonment funding

As part of securing the first of two five-year extensions to the Etame field production license to which we are entitled from the government of Gabon, we agreed to a cash funding arrangement for the eventual abandonment of all offshore wells, platforms and facilities on the Etame Marin block. The agreement was finalized in the first quarter of 2014 (effective as of 2011) providing for annual funding over a period of ten years in amounts equal to 12.14% of the total abandonment estimate for the first seven years and 5.0% per year for the last three years of the production license. The amounts paid will be reimbursed through the cost account and are non-refundable. The abandonment estimate used for this purpose is approximately $61.1 million ($19.0 million net to VAALCO) on an undiscounted basis. Through June  30, 2017, $27.4 million ($8.5 million net to VAALCO) on an undiscounted basis has been funded. This cash funding is reflected under “Other noncurrent assets” as “Abandonment funding” on our condensed consolidated balance sheet. Future changes to the anticipated abandonment cost estimate could change our asset retirement obligation and the amount of future abandonment funding payments.

Audits

We are subject to periodic routine audits by various government agencies in Gabon, including audits of our petroleum cost account, customs, taxes and other operational matters, as well as audits by other members of the contractor group under our joint operating agreements.

As of December 31, 2016, we had accrued $1.0 million net to VAALCO in “Accrued liabilities and other” on our condensed consolidated balance sheet for certain payroll taxes in Gabon which were not paid pertaining to labor provided to us over a number of years by a third-party contractor. While the payroll taxes were for individuals who were not our employees, we could be deemed liable for these expenses as the end user of the services provided. These liabilities were substantially resolved at the accrued amount in January 2017.

In 2016, the government of Gabon conducted an audit of our operations in Gabon, covering the years 2013 through 2014. We received the findings from this audit and responded to the audit findings in January 2017. We do not anticipate that the ultimate outcome of this audit will have a material effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.

Rig commitment

In 2014, we entered into a long-term contract for the Constellation II drilling rig that was under a long-term contract for the multi-well development drilling campaign offshore Gabon. The campaign included the drilling of development wells and workovers of existing wells in the Etame Marin block. We began demobilization in January 2016 and released the drilling rig in February 2016, prior to the

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original July 2016 contract termination date, because we no longer intended to drill any wells in 2016 on our Etame Marin block offshore Gabon. In June 2016, we reached an agreement with the drilling contractor for us to pay $5.1 million net to VAALCO’s interest for unused rig days under the contract. We paid this amount, plus the demobilization charges, in seven equal monthly installments, which began in July 2016 and ended in January 2017. The related expense was reported in the “Other operating expense” line item in our condensed consolidated statement of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016.

7. DERIVATIVES AND FAIR VALUE

During 2016, we executed crude oil put contracts as market conditions allowed in order to economically hedge anticipated 2016 and 2017 cash flows from crude oil producing activities. While these crude oil puts are intended to be an economic hedge to mitigate the impact of a decline in oil prices, we have not elected hedge accounting. The contracts are being measured at fair value each period, with changes in fair value recognized in net income. These changes in fair value have no cash flow impact. The impact to cash flow occurs upon settlement of the underlying contract. We do not enter into derivative instruments for speculative or trading proposes.

As of June 30, 2017, we had unexpired oil puts covering 360,000 barrels of anticipated sales volumes for the period from July 2017 through December 31, 2017 at a weighted average price of $50.00. Our put contracts are subject to agreements similar to a master netting agreement, under which we have the legal right to offset assets and liabilities. At June 30, 2017, our unexpired oil puts represented a fair value asset position of $1.2 million in the Prepayments and other line of our condensed consolidated balance sheets.

The following table sets forth, by level within the fair value hierarchy and location on our condensed consolidated balance sheets, the reported values of derivative instruments accounted for at fair value on a recurring basis:





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

Carrying

 

Fair Value Measurements Using

Derivative Item

 

Balance Sheet Line

 

Value

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3



 

 

 

(in thousands)

Crude oil puts

 

Prepayments and other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2017

 

$

1,176 

 

$

 -

 

$

1,176 

 

$

 -

Balance at December 31, 2016

 

$

1,227 

 

$

 -

 

$

1,227 

 

$

 -

The crude oil put contracts are measured at fair value using the Black’s option pricing model. Level 2 observable inputs used in the valuation model include market information as of the reporting date, such as prevailing Brent crude futures prices, Brent crude futures commodity price volatility and interest rates.  The determination of the put contract fair value includes the impact of the counterparty’s non-performance risk. 

To mitigate counterparty risk, we enter into such derivative contracts with creditworthy financial institutions deemed by management as competent and competitive market makers.

The following table sets forth the gain (loss) on derivative instruments in our condensed consolidated statements of operations:





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

Gain (Loss)



 

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

Derivative Item

 

Statement of Operations Line

 

2017

 

2016

 

2017

 

2016



 

 

 

(in thousands)

Crude oil puts

 

Other, net

 

$

130 

 

$

(578)

 

$

(50)

 

$

(578)



















8.  COMPENSATION

Our stock-based compensation has been granted under several stock incentive and long-term incentive plans. The plans authorize the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors to issue various types of incentive compensation. Currently, we have issued stock options, restricted shares and SARs under the 2014 Long-Term Incentive Plan (“2014 Plan”). At June 30, 2017, 1,667,880 shares were authorized for future grants under this plan.

For each stock option granted, the number of authorized shares under the 2014 Plan will be reduced on a one-for-one basis. For each restricted share granted, the number of shares authorized under the 2014 Plan will be reduced by twice the number of restricted shares. We have no set policy for sourcing shares for option grants. Historically the shares issued under option grants have been new shares.

We record non-cash compensation expense related to stock-based compensation as general and administrative expense. For the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, non-cash compensation was $0.6 million and $1.0 million, respectively, related to the issuance of stock options and restricted stock. For the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, non-cash compensation was $0.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively, related to the issuance of stock options and restricted stock. Because we do not pay significant United States federal income taxes, no amounts were recorded for future tax benefits.

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Stock options

Stock options have an exercise price that may not be less than the fair market value of the underlying shares on the date of grant. In general, stock options granted to participants will become exercisable over a period determined by the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors, which in the past has been a five year life, with the options vesting over a service period of up to five years. In addition, stock options will become exercisable upon a change in control, unless provided otherwise by the Compensation Committee. There were immaterial cash proceeds from the exercise of stock options in the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016. For the six months ended June 30, 2017, options for 1,550,442 shares were granted to employees; these options vest over a three-year period, vesting in three equal parts on the first, second and third anniversaries after the date of grant. Options for 465,950 shares were granted to our non-employee directors, which were fully vested upon their grant.

Stock option activity for the six months ended June 30, 2017 is provided below:



 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 



 

Number of

 

Weighted



 

Shares

 

Average



 

Underlying

 

Exercise Price



 

Options

 

Per Share



 

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Outstanding at January 1, 2017

 

2,644 

 

$

3.92 

Granted

 

1,550 

 

 

0.99 

Exercised

 

(37)

 

 

1.04 

Forfeited/expired

 

(824)

 

 

5.75 

Outstanding at June 30, 2017

 

3,333 

 

 

2.14 



Restricted shares

Restricted stock granted to employees will vest over a period determined by the Compensation Committee which is generally a three year period, vesting in three equal parts on the first three anniversaries of the date of the grant. Share grants to directors vest immediately and are not restricted. The following is a summary of activity in unvested restricted stock in the six months ended June 30, 2017.



 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

Weighted



 

Restricted

 

Average



 

Stock

 

Grant Price

Non-vested shares outstanding at January 1, 2017

 

251,853 

 

$

1.31 

Awards granted

 

385,939 

 

 

0.98 

Awards vested

 

(202,020)

 

 

0.99 

Awards forfeited

 

 -

 

 

 -

Non-vested shares outstanding at June 30, 2017

 

435,772 

 

 

1.17 

In the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, no shares were added to treasury due to tax withholding as a result of the vesting of restricted shares. In the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, no shares and 31,808 shares, respectively, were added to treasury stock as a result of tax withholding on the vesting of restricted shares.

Stock appreciation rights (“SARs”)

SARs are granted under the VAALCO Energy, Inc. 2016 Stock Appreciation Rights Plan. A SAR is the right to receive a cash amount equal to the spread with respect to a share of common stock upon the exercise of the SAR. The spread is the difference between the SAR price per share specified in a SAR award on the date of grant (which may not be less than the fair market value of our common stock on the date of grant) and the fair market value per share on the date of exercise of the SAR. SARs granted to participants will become exercisable over a period determined by the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors. In addition, SARs will become exercisable upon a change in control, unless provided otherwise by the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors.

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, 1,049,528 SARs were granted, all having an exercise price of $1.20 per share. One-third of the SARs are to vest on or after the first anniversary of the grant date at such time when the market price per share of our common stock exceeds $1.30; one-third of the SARs are to vest on or after the second anniversary of the grant date at such time when the share price exceeds $1.50; and one-third of the SARs are to vest on or after the third anniversary of the grant date at such time when the share price exceeds $1.75. SARs granted in 2016 vest over a three year period with a life of 5 years; these SARs have a

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maximum spread equal to 300% of the $1.04 SAR price per share specified in a SAR award on the date of grant. The amounts of compensation payable related to these awards through June 30, 2017 have not been significant.

SAR activity for the six months ended June 30, 2017 is provided below:





 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 



 

Number of

 

Weighted



 

Shares

 

Average



 

Underlying

 

Exercise Price



 

SARs

 

Per Share

Outstanding at January 1, 2017

 

179,580 

 

$

1.04 

Granted

 

1,049,528 

 

 

1.20 

Forfeited/expired

 

 -

 

 

 -

Outstanding at June 30, 2017

 

1,229,108 

 

 

1.18 

















9. INCOME TAXES

VAALCO and its domestic subsidiaries file a consolidated United States income tax return. Certain subsidiaries’ operations are also subject to foreign income taxes.

As discussed further in the Notes to the consolidated financial statements in our Form 10-K for December 31, 2016, we have deferred tax assets related to foreign tax credits, alternative minimum tax credits, and domestic and foreign net operating losses (“NOLs”). Management assesses the available positive and negative evidence to estimate if existing deferred tax assets will be utilized. We do not anticipate utilization of the foreign tax credits prior to expiration nor do we expect to generate sufficient taxable income to utilize other deferred tax assets. On the basis of this evaluation, full valuation allowances have been recorded as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016.

Income taxes attributable to continuing operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 are attributable to foreign taxes payable in Gabon.

In April 2017, we were notified by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) that they would be conducting an audit of our 2014 U.S. federal tax return. This audit is in the preliminary stages; to date, the IRS has not communicated any findings.    

10.  EARNINGS PER SHARE

Basic earnings per share (“EPS”) is calculated using the average number of shares of common stock outstanding during each period. For the calculation of diluted shares, we assume that restricted stock is outstanding on the date of vesting, and we assume the issuance of shares from the exercise of stock options using the treasury stock method.

A reconciliation from basic to diluted shares follows:   



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

Six Months Ended June 30,



 

2017

 

2016

 

2017

 

2016



 

(in thousands)

Basic weighted average shares outstanding

 

58,658 

 

58,464 

 

58,613 

 

58,488 

Effect of dilutive securities

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

 -

Diluted weighted average shares outstanding

 

58,658 

 

58,464 

 

58,619 

 

58,488 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock options and unvested restricted stock grants excluded from dilutive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

calculation because they would be anti-dilutive

 

3,307 

 

4,413 

 

2,772 

 

3,522 

Because we recognized a net loss for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, there were no dilutive securities for those periods.

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11.  SEGMENT INFORMATION

Our operations are based in Gabon, Equatorial Guinea and the U.S.  Each of our three reportable operating segments is organized and managed based upon geographic location. Our Chief Executive Officer, who is the chief operating decision maker, and management, review and evaluate the operation of each geographic segment separately primarily based on Operating income (loss). The operations of all segments include exploration for and production of hydrocarbons where commercial reserves have been found and developed. Revenues are based on the location of hydrocarbon production. Corporate and other is primarily corporate and operations support costs which are not allocated to the reportable operating segments.

Segment activity of continuing operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 and segment assets at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 are as follows:







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended June 30, 2017

(in thousands)

 

Gabon

 

Equatorial Guinea

 

U.S.

 

Corporate and Other

 

Total

Revenues-oil and natural gas sales

 

$

20,415 

 

$

 -

 

$

10 

 

$

 -

 

$

20,425 

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

 

1,902 

 

 

 -

 

 

 

 

68 

 

 

1,970 

Bad debt expense and other

 

 

183 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

183 

Operating income (loss)

 

 

8,090 

 

 

(15)

 

 

339 

 

 

(2,827)

 

 

5,587 

Interest income (expense), net

 

 

(378)

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

(378)

Income tax expense

 

 

3,096 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

3,096 

Additions to property and equipment

 

 

625 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

625 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended June 30, 2016

(in thousands)

 

Gabon

 

Equatorial Guinea

 

U.S.

 

Corporate and Other

 

Total

Revenues-oil and natural gas sales

 

$

18,764 

 

$

 -

 

$

83 

 

$

 -

 

$

18,847 

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

 

1,833 

 

 

 -

 

 

42 

 

 

67 

 

 

1,942 

Bad debt expense and other

 

 

171 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

171 

Other operating expense

 

 

754 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

754 

Operating income (loss)

 

 

8,424 

 

 

(87)

 

 

 -

 

 

(3,722)

 

 

4,615 

Interest income (expense), net

 

 

(1,468)

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

(2)

 

 

(1,470)

Income tax expense

 

 

3,001 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

3,001 

Additions to property and equipment

 

 

(2,493)

 

 

 -

 

 

140 

 

 

 -

 

 

(2,353)



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Six Months Ended June 30, 2017

(in thousands)

 

Gabon

 

Equatorial Guinea

 

U.S.

 

Corporate and Other

 

Total

Revenues-oil and natural gas sales

 

$

41,661 

 

$

 -

 

$

30 

 

$

 -

 

$

41,691 

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

 

3,711 

 

 

 -

 

 

 

 

127 

 

 

3,839 

Bad debt expense and other

 

 

281 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

281 

Operating income (loss)

 

 

19,050 

 

 

(53)

 

 

346 

 

 

(5,608)

 

 

13,735 

Interest income (expense), net

 

 

(781)

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

(781)

Income tax expense

 

 

6,290 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

6,290 

Additions to property and equipment

 

 

814 

 

 

 -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

814 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Six Months Ended June 30, 2016

(in thousands)

 

Gabon

 

Equatorial Guinea

 

U.S.

 

Corporate and Other

 

Total

Revenues-oil and natural gas sales

 

$

29,672 

 

$

 -

 

$

151 

 

$

 -

 

$

29,823 

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

 

3,976 

 

 

 -

 

 

63 

 

 

141 

 

 

4,180 

Bad debt expense and other

 

 

514 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

514 

Other operating expense

 

 

9,635 

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

9,635 

Operating income (loss)

 

 

(3,532)

 

 

(135)

 

 

(3)

 

 

(5,230)

 

 

(8,900)

Interest expense, net

 

 

(1,956)

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

(2)

 

 

(1,958)

Income tax expense

 

 

4,686